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The Saudi war in Iraq and lessons for Pakistan

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Daily Times: Facing its own Shia problem, Saudi Arabia is now moving to counter this ‘pernicious’ influence by creating Sunni fiefdoms all around the Islamic world. Saudification of Sunni Islam worldwide in any event has been a long-standing project of the Kingdom

Will Iraq disintegrate? The thing with nation states, as these were formed in the 20th century, is that they had attempted to draw borders around diverse people. This is truer of certain states more than others, especially Iraq, but to some extent also states like Turkey and Pakistan. A lot will depend on whether the autonomous Iraqi Kurdish region will now choose to take advantage of the current Shia-Sunni war and go its independent way or stand with the central government in its hour of need. Statesmanship demands that Kurdish leaders maintain the status quo and stick it out. If there has to be a move for Kurdish independence, it cannot be at this time. The idea of an autonomous Kurdistan within Iraq can be a model for many countries around the world but a separate Kurdistan will only serve to create similar impulses in other countries.
In the digital age, the demise of the very idea of the nation state has been brought about by the globalisation of ancient religious feuds. Saudi Arabia, which has for long seen itself as the vanguard of Wahabi-Sunni Islam, has been alarmed since the early days of the Iraq War by Iran’s growing influence in Iraq and indeed states like Bahrain. Facing its own Shia problem, Saudi Arabia is now moving to counter this ‘pernicious’ influence by creating Sunni fiefdoms all around the Islamic world. Saudification of Sunni Islam worldwide in any event has been a long-standing project of the Kingdom, which has poured in huge sums of money into religious madrassas (seminaries) and mosques all around the world. The US’s shortsighted policy in Syria and its colossal miscalculation of what the Arab Spring meant for the larger Middle East has directly contributed to this scenario. It is a case of the Arab Spring chickens coming home to roost.
The problem that this situation poses may have ancient origins but the problem itself is a very modern one: how does religion interact with established markers of modernity? Muslim modernism, which now is a century and a half old, sought to reconcile Islam with modern ideas by arguing for ijtihad (independent reasoning). Ultimately though, especially after the end of the Cold War, it was global Islamic revivalism that won the day. Muslim modernism was shunned as being intellectually shallow and, in some ways, apologetic. In comparison, the revivalist Islamic groups and the federated global jihad are unapologetic about what they want: world domination and an end to all creeds other than their own narrow-minded interpretation of Islam. A common thread between all Saudi-funded Islamist militants, be they in Nigeria, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan or Pakistan, is their desire to create an ‘Islamic caliphate’. The names they use — for example the Levant or more locally Khorasan — are an implicit rejection of the existing nation states in these regions. This implicit rejection is not always recognised for what it is and sometimes is an objective shared by the ruling elites. Erdogan for example seems to fantasise about resuscitating the Ottoman Empire, encouraging his followers to refer to him as ‘Sultan’. Policymakers in Pakistan’s establishment have long had the fantasy of a Pakistan extending all the way into Central Asia, united by Islam and Pakistan’s army.

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Posted by on June 16, 2014. Filed under Anti Islam act by Muslims,Asia,Pakistan. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

3 Responses to The Saudi war in Iraq and lessons for Pakistan

  1. Rafiq A. Tschannen

    June 16, 2014 at 4:08 am

    The Kurdistan region of Iraq is indeed something special: De-facto they are already independent. The Central Government has no authority there. There staying nominally with Iraq has been a great advantage to them: They share with the Central Government’s oil revenues (and put them to better use than the Center does). They can meddle in Iraq’s affairs and are indeed the ‘Kingmakers’ (whom ever they support has the best chance to remain President). If I was in power in Iraq I would in fact have given them their full independence, rather than for them to ‘eat the cake and keep the cash’.

  2. Robert Adams

    June 16, 2014 at 5:16 am

    The article says, “the revivalist Islamic groups and the federated global jihad are unapologetic about what they want: world domination and an end to all creeds other than their own narrow-minded interpretation of Islam”. That is the crux of the situation. Now, what can the world (including those Muslims whose faith is not ‘in line’ with those “revivalist Islamic groups”) do to thwart them? I ask because I’m not certain. Surely, mere words won’t deter them. Economic sanctions? I hardly think so. The KSA (and its minions) is immune from that for the obvious reason that they possess what so much of what the world wants and needs. So what is left? More war? It would take war on a scale not seen in the Middle East ever. Far larger than the conflicts seen since 1948. I find that prospect horrific. So, I don’t know the answer. But, what I do know is that I fear for us all…

  3. Rafiq A. Tschannen

    June 16, 2014 at 9:14 am

    Robert Adams: Indeed. We know the answer (theoretically): The Ahmadiyya Khilafat of peace and tolerance instead of the ‘Islamic Khalifate of Iraq and the Levant’, which is cutting off heads to show that they are a serious player in today’s world. In the long run we have faith in Allah and we have faith in the good sense of humans. Everyone will choose peace over terror. But, yes, the terrorists will not give up that easily. May Allah be our helper and protector at all times.

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